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  • Sticky's Avatar
    02-19-2018, 10:52 AM
    This image leaked out from a garage showing what appears to be the undisguised rear end of the upcoming 992 generation Porsche 911. Based on previous covered up spy photos this seems to be the back of the 911 Carrera S. The image was since deleted from the social media account that posted it which means this is likely legitimate. The 992 is shaping up well.
    23 replies | 340 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    02-19-2018, 11:32 AM
    Nice of FVD to finally join the 991.2 3.0 tuning party but they are definitely late and not bringing anything interesting to the table. First of all, when you launch a tune you need to prove the output you are making. FVD does not. No graph, no acceleration figures, nothing. The 0-60 claim they provide is slower than stock test figures. Who writes this stuff for FVD? It's terrible: FVD Software Power Gains: Max. Power - 335 kW (455 HP) @ 6500rpm Max. Torque - 580 Nm (428 lb.-ft.) @ 1900rpm Max. Speed - 305 km/h (189 mph) Max. RPM - 7900 rpm Acceleration 0-100 km/h (0-62.5 mph)* - 4.0s They also claim to bump the redline to 7900 rpm and state the stock car revs to 7800. It doesn't. It revs to 7500. So what we have are several mistakes, no proof, and consumers just having to take their word for it. FVD's launch makes GIAC's release look stellar in comparison. Even if FVD is hitting their 455 crank horsepower target the PorscheBoost.com project 991.2 hit that number to wheels with Gintani tuning months ago. Way too little, way too late from FVD.
    24 replies | 269 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    02-20-2018, 12:12 PM
    This is a battle we have all been waiting to see. The Audi RS7 4.0 TFSI V8 gets a ton of credit and deservedly so. There were those who mocked Audi for providing the smallest twin turbo V8 in last generation's mid-size sport sedan market yet Audi's potent mill proved to be the strongest tune only despite its displacement disadvantage. Amusingly, Mercedes-AMG went to a similar style V8 for the new W213 E63 yet it isn't as strong with a tune as the now old RS7. Obviously, the 4.0 TFSI is stout with RS7's running 10.2's in the 1/4 mile at 133+ which is the stock turbo record in the USA. The RS3 is already beating that. Easily. The little brother barely entered the market and is already kicking ass and taking names. Now what is interesting in the video here is you have an RS7 on upgraded Garrett turbochargers. You will notice there are not really any successful upgraded turbo RS7's running around and this RS7 is said to still be under development. The RS3 has a big turbo setup from Iroz on E85. What happens? The RS3 spanks it. The guy in the RS7 needs his eyes checked if he thinks that was close. Say what you want about having a V8 carrying 1000 less pounds makes a huge difference. So does that dual clutch transmission in the RS3. From a 35 mph roll it's ugly too. The RS3 runs away. Why haven't big turbo RS7's shown well? Who knows. Big turbo RS3's are already crushing them though and it's not likely to get any closer from here on out as 2.5 TFSI tuning accelerates.
    17 replies | 351 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    02-20-2018, 12:07 PM
    This is a battle we have all been waiting to see. The Audi RS7 4.0 TFSI V8 gets a ton of credit and deservedly so. There were those who mocked Audi for providing the smallest twin turbo V8 in last generation's mid-size sport sedan market yet Audi's potent mill proved to be the strongest tune only despite its displacement disadvantage. Amusingly, Mercedes-AMG went to a similar style V8 for the new W213 E63 yet it isn't as strong with a tune as the now old RS7. Obviously, the 4.0 TFSI is stout with RS7's running 10.2's in the 1/4 mile at 133+ which is the stock turbo record in the USA. The RS3 is already beating that. Easily. The little brother barely entered the market and is already kicking ass and taking names. Now what is interesting in the video here is you have an RS7 on upgraded Garrett turbochargers. You will notice there are not really any successful upgraded turbo RS7's running around and this RS7 is said to still be under development. The RS3 has a big turbo setup from Iroz on E85. What happens? The RS3 spanks it. The guy in the RS7 needs his eyes checked if he thinks that was close. Say what you want about having a V8 carrying 1000 less pounds makes a huge difference. So does that dual clutch transmission in the RS3. From a 35 mph roll it's ugly too. The RS3 runs away. Why haven't big turbo RS7's shown well? Who knows. Big turbo RS3's are already crushing them though and it's not likely to get any closer from here on out as 2.5 TFSI tuning accelerates.
    17 replies | 130 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    02-21-2018, 01:13 PM
    The factory Hellcat blower is a 2.4 liter twin screw unit. A very good blower but if you want more power a bigger blower isn't a bad idea. What is interesting to note here is Magnuson's swap kit replaces the twin screw with a TVS2650 unit. It is not a twin screw but a roots unit although a much more advanced design than traditional roots blowers. The extra .25 liters is nice but it is the efficiency gain that making the real difference. These were the claims Magnuson made last year when they announced the blower swap kit: True reliable operating range to 20,000 RPM 33% higher flow than TVS2300 10% higher flow than a 2.9 screw 14% higher adiabatic efficiency at 14k rpm and 2.0 pressure ratio compared to screw 2.9 at the same flow 75F lower discharge temperature at 14k rpm and 2.0 pressure ratio compared to screw 2.9 at the same flow 26 HP less input power required at 14k rpm and 2.0 pressure ration compared to screw 2.9 at the same flow Well, they weren't lying as they hit 946 horsepower to the wheels on a stock internal Hellcat at only 5800 rpm while running out of fuel. Some bigger injectors and... easy 1000+ rwhp? It sure looks like it.
    13 replies | 192 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    02-22-2018, 03:03 PM
    It does not matter what the platform is at some point you will surpass the capability of the factory engine design when adding power/torque. In the Honda world this is fairly common. It's even common in the Nissan GTR world. What do you do when that happens? You go to a billet engine block. The factory design can only be reinforced so many ways but it is always a compromise. A ground-up billet design for the application is the proper (albeit expensive) way to do it reliably. Do you really think those 1500+ horsepower Hondas and 2500+ horsepower Nissan GTR's are doing it on factory blocks? Absolutely not. This is how you get to a custom billet block capable of huge power according to Bullet Race Engineering: 1. Start with an OEM block. Scan it to establish baseline dimensions 2. Improve the design to make it more rigid, more durable, more reliable 3. Load a 130 kilogram block of 6061 aluminium billet into the 4-axis CNC mill 4. Remove most of the material until it looks like a Honda B-series 5. Keep removing metal 6. Now you have a block suitable for all Honda B-series applications that is better in every way and only requires minimal modifications to replace the original block 7. Throw the original block in the skip with the swarf - it's still worth a few dollars as scrap metal What you see there will hold 1700+ horsepower and will run you $7500+ dollars. That may sound like a lot but it is actually affordable. For one, you have the Honda volume so several of these will sell plus it being a four-cylinder requires less material and makes for an easier design. A Nissan GTR VR38DETT 4.0 liter 2500+ hp capable billet engine block can run over $25k. How much power do you want to reliably make and what do you want to spend? That is what it comes down to.
    5 replies | 587 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:51 PM
    It seems the 992 hype just can not die down and Porsche put up a press release to address some issues. They do not reveal anything earth shattering but seem to want to emphasize that the 911 will remain a 911. Why was this necessary? It seems the purists are already complaining about certain elements. The shifter is puzzling for sure. It seems Porsche is bracing enthusiasts for some big changes including electrification: “The new 911, too, will be the best 911 of all time.” We'll be the judge of that, thanks. There’s an oft-repeated anecdote from 1990: the setting is a technical seminar in Berlin for engineers in the automotive industry. During a break, two participants are talking about the Porsche 911. One of them, a leading engineer for a major carmaker from southern Germany, says: “If I had to improve that car, I wouldn’t have the foggiest idea. I think it would be incredibly difficult.” The other, a leading engineer at Porsche, regards his counterpart with incredulity—and says nothing. It still elicits a chuckle from August Achleitner today when he thinks of his befuddlement back then in Berlin. Further developing the Porsche 911 has been his job for almost twenty years. Achleitner is the director of the 911 model line and is thus something like the keeper of the Porsche grail. “The heart of the company,” he calls the 911. If one were to strip down everything that bears a Porsche logo, that exemplifies and drives the company, to reveal the core of the brand, it would look like a 911. With its unmistakable flyline—the typical roof line—the 911’s style-defining basic form retains its freshness and trailblazing spirit even today. It’s all about that sporty note The next 911, generation 992, will carry on that proud tradition. “We know where we’re from and where we want to go,” says Achleitner. “The decisive factor is that the 911 generates a driving feeling that no other car can impart.” That’s not meant in an arrogant way, it’s really just the nature of things: the specific seat position, the flat-six engine in the rear, its inimitable sound, the astonishing amount of space, the perfect feedback from the brakes, steering, and pedal system together with the striking suspension, the powerfully dynamic but always easily controllable burst of power, and the one-of-a-kind design that ties it all together, making this car the epitome of what it has meant to be a sports car—for fifty-five years. Achleitner: “We know where we’re from and where we want to go.” The riveting question is how the 911 needs to develop in the future to continue to define the brand as the gravitational core of Porsche. Automotive industry megatrends—including digitalization, electrification, and connectivity—will play a role, as well as the question of how these trends should be evaluated. “With each innovation, the decisive factor for me is whether it suits the character of the 911,” explains Achleitner. “We don’t necessarily have to be the first in this regard with the 911. What’s crucial, rather, is that every innovation be offered in a typical Porsche manifestation.” Here, it’s the designers, above all, who are called on to work their magic, according to the 911 chief. The 996, for example, was the first to feature a navigation system. When Achleitner looks at this model today, he still finds it beautiful and elegant, although he has to admit that some elements strike him as a bit outdated now. It pains him, “because the car suffers for it.” It’s therefore important, he feels, to design digital interfaces between people and machines that are as timeless as possible. “Anything but contrived,” is Achleitner’s creed. He’s convinced: “Even where the public might be expecting a bigger ‘wow factor,’ in the long run a certain aesthetic reserve pays dividends.” The joy of driving always has to be in the foreground But the visual packaging of new technologies is just one aspect. The other aspects involve the capabilities that they enable. “Even when it comes to the individual assistance systems, they have to fit with the 911,” underscores Achleitner. After all, no one buys a sports car because it offers adaptive cruise control or a lane-keeping assist function. “Those are convenient and useful things. But the customer has to make the choice to use them and, above all, be able to switch them off when they’re not desired.” One thing is especially important to him: the joy of driving always has to be in the foreground. “That’s why a 911 will always have a steering wheel.” And if autonomously driving cars break through more quickly than expected? “Then the 911 will be one of the last cars to drive autonomously.” “The decisive factor is that the 911 generates a driving feeling that no other car can impart.” In all discussions of autonomous driving, Achleitner hews to his line: Porsche and the 911 are a bastion of stability amid the hype, which heretofore has primarily consisted of mere announcements and statements. The 911 will not change radically—and yet it does evolve. It was 1997 when the era of air-cooled engines came to an end and the age of water-cooled flat-six engines began. It was 2015 when the last naturally aspirated engine in the rear of the Carrera was completely replaced by a turbo engine. “Some fans rushed the barricades; it was all gloom and doom for many,” recalls Achleitner. “And then the same thing happened as always: nothing.” The new models have always received even more rave reviews than their predecessors. “That encourages us to think about fundamental innovations in the future as well.” Electric drive technology? Why not? Electric drive technology is a good example. “Two years ago I’d have said no way. Today I wouldn’t categorically rule it out,” concedes the head of the model line. Just to preclude any misunderstandings: the Porsche 911, Type 992 is not an electric sports car. But it could be an option somewhere down the line. Achleitner describes his ongoing change of heart: “I drove the prototype of our coming electric sports car, the Mission E, and it was a very compelling experience. And the performance of the Porsche LMP race cars with hybrid drive systems is quite simply sensational.” Achleitner is certain that no car with a combustion engine alone could beat them around the corner. Although he admittedly clings to the flat-six engine, he can, nowadays, imagine an electric motor in the 911. So there will be a next step in terms of drive technology—if it fits Porsche and the specific character of the 911. The secret of the Porsche 911 could perhaps be described as follows: it’s the sportiest and most dynamic car in the company’s line-up, but also its bastion of stability. A point of orientation for which Achleitner has found a very simple development principle—which may have something to do with that short talk back in Berlin in 1990. In contrast to his counterpart that day, he does have an idea: “The new 911, too, will be the best 911 of all time.”
    10 replies | 129 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    02-21-2018, 01:36 PM
    Automotive forums are a double edged sword. They can be a repository of valuable information with incredibly knowledgeable and helpful members. They can also have know-it-all's who spread misinformation and think they are never wrong. The BoostAddict forums are worth every penny, right?
    4 replies | 802 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    02-22-2018, 02:11 PM
    Speedometer overlay videos are flawed because speedometers often lie. They are not nearly 100% accurate and that is why GPS should always be used for comparisons such as this. That said, holy crap is the M760Li a beast. The Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid has a dual clutch transmission and is rated at 680 horsepower thanks to its electric motor assisting. It's fast but it's also heavy considering the standard Panamera Turbo is over 4500 pounds. What does the E-Hybrid really weigh? Not that the M760Li is a lightweight. All wheel drive, a 600 horsepower 6.6 liter twin turbo V12, and an extended wheelbase make for a heavy recipe at roughly 4800 pounds. However, there are no batteries or electric motors. The more powerful Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid should easily hit 300 earlier, right? Wrong. The M760Li trails a bit off the launch but just becomes a freight train past 100 miles per and easily hits well past 300 kph which the Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid does not even reach. It may not be an official M car but the M760Li is a force to be reckoned with and clearly an Autobahn terror.
    6 replies | 324 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    02-20-2018, 02:11 PM
    Well, the competition is over. The winner? The Lamborghini Huracan Performante. Let's just quickly remind you what cars it took down. The Chevrolet C7 Corvette Z06, Acura NSX, McLaren 720S, Audi R8 V10 Plus, Porsche 991.2 GT3, and the Mercedes-AMG GT R. Here are their laptimes from slowest to quickest: NSX: 1:00.32 R8: 59.80 GT3: 59.20 720S: 58.60 GT R: 58.32 Z06: 58.12 How did the Lamborghini Huracan Performante do? 57.52 That is a decisive victory. It is interesting to note the Lamborghini is not the lightest or most powerful of the group. It certainly seems to be the most well rounded and engaging though. The suspension and aerodynamics are clearly world class. Who said the naturally aspirated motor is dead when it comes to performance? Reifen: Pirelli P-Zero Trofeo R. Rundenzeit: Lamborghini Huracán Performante: 0.57,52 min.
    8 replies | 136 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    02-19-2018, 12:11 PM
    You obviously recognize the Audi 8V RS3 sedan with a turbo upgrade as it recently knocked on the doorstep of breaking into the 9's. With a trap speed in the ~140 range it is a really, really fast car. A bolt on Audi RS3 on an E85 tune is no slouch either. This is what the real world difference of 10+ mph of trap speed looks like:
    7 replies | 317 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:10 PM
    The N55 continues to come into its own with big singles leading the way. DocRace offers a Precision 6266 based turbo kit for the N55 that is in a top mount configuration. Nothing quite like opening the engine bay and seeing a big single turbo sitting there, right? Let's go over the mod list on this car: F30 335i N55 engine DocRace 6266 top mount single turbo JB4, BMS back end flash E85 Port injection Port injection obviously makes the 663 whp possible on full E85: It looks like it pulls strong up top too but a better quality graph is really warranted. Excellent N55 numbers but wow does the owner have bad taste when it comes to cosmetic mods. Red mesh and roundels? Clown car. At least it is fast so you don't have to look at it.
    6 replies | 198 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    02-20-2018, 02:05 PM
    Well, the competition is over. The winner? The Lamborghini Huracan Performante. Let's just quickly remind you what cars it took down. The Chevrolet C7 Corvette Z06, Acura NSX, McLaren 720S, Audi R8 V10 Plus, Porsche 991.2 GT3, and the Mercedes-AMG GT R. Here are their laptimes from slowest to quickest: NSX: 1:00.32 R8: 59.80 GT3: 59.20 720S: 58.60 GT R: 58.32 Z06: 58.12 How did the Lamborghini Huracan Performante do? 57.52 That is a decisive victory. It is interesting to note the Lamborghini is not the lightest or most powerful of the group. It certainly seems to be the most well rounded and engaging though. The suspension and aerodynamics are clearly world class. Who said the naturally aspirated motor is dead when it comes to performance? Reifen: Pirelli P-Zero Trofeo R. Rundenzeit: Lamborghini Huracán Performante: 0.57,52 min.
    8 replies | 64 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    02-19-2018, 10:41 AM
    This is admittedly a cool swap. Why? For one, it isn't another LSX V8 into a BMW chassis. There is something special about sticking with BMW M power. The 400 horsepower S62 V8 comes from the E39 M5. It is not BimmerBoost's favorite M powerplant or V8 of all time for that matter but it certainly would change the character of this car. Not to mention, offer something unique that BMW themselves would not do. If going for power though the iron bloc I6 powerplant can make much more than the S62 V8. That is why some E39 M5 owners ditch their V8 for an S50/S52 I6 and turbocharge it. Still, definitely a cool swap. Now how about doing an S85 V10 and showing BMW's version of a Viper?
    6 replies | 365 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    02-20-2018, 04:41 PM
    The 435i in the video is tuned with a BMS JB5 pushing roughly 17.5 psi of boost on E85. It has bolt on mods consisting of a downpipe and intake. The 3.0 liter N55 is matching up against a stock W205 Mercedes-AMG C63 S. Even though the Mercedes is stock and the heavier chassis it is bringing with it a 4.0 liter M177 twin turbo V8 and well over 500 horsepower. A stock M177 S is in the ~465 whp range with ~490 lb-ft of torque at the wheels. The 435i is simply overmatched. It hangs in fairly well all things considering but it struggles against a stock M177 which means if the C63 gets a tune it will be in another zip code.
    4 replies | 533 view(s)
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