• Porsche identifies the 991 GT3 3.8 liter flat-6 engine problem and it is related to the connecting rod bolts - Every 2014 991 GT3 3.8 flat-6 will be replaced

      Ouch. That is not going to be cheap. Porsche decided to opt for a direct injected 3.8 liter flat-6 for the 991 GT3 for several reasons and one of the major ones was to save money. By sharing an engine block with the 991 Carrera, Carrera S, Boxter S, and Cayman S Porsche would save a ton of money producing all the motors at a single factory. Well, that decision is coming back to bite them in the rear ends as the ghost of the Mezger has exacted its revenge.


      Every single Porsche 991 GT3 will get a new engine due to the engine fire issue arising from cracked blocks spilling oil. Apparently just changing what Porsche identifies as faulty connecting rod bolts (item number 7 pictured) would not appease owners or preserve the 991 GT3's value as well as a brand spanking new motor so roughly ~700 GT3's are getting their motors pulled.

      Every previous generation GT3 had a flat-6 engine block designed by Hans Mezger. He was an engineer famous for designing Motorsport motors and designed what became known as the GT1 engine block for Porsche. This engine block served as the basis for the 996 and 997 GT3 models as well as the 996 Turbo, 996 GT2, 997.1 Turbo, and 997 GT2. This engine block was originally conceived for the Porsche 911 GT1 which won Le Mans in 1998.

      The new direct injected Porsche engine blocks have not won Le Mans, let's put it that way. The block could not even survive the first year of 991 GT3 production. Somebody has to say it, Porsche deserves this for cutting costs and taking race bred parts out of the street cars. They deserve this and as does any other manufacturer who produces a street car using their race cars name without the race cars most vital parts.

      A Porsche spokesperson stated, "We are in the process of validating the revised par. We will be replacing the engines in each of the 911 GT3s that have been built thus far."

      Would this problem have ever reared its head if the GT3 was sporting an engine tested in the rigors of Motorsport? Nope. But Porsche will fix it and we will move on. There still is something here that makes you wonder if the cheaper route really comes out cheaper in the end.

      Source
      This article was originally published in forum thread: Porsche identifies the 991 GT3 3.8 liter flat-6 engine problem and it is related to the connecting rod bolts - Every 2014 991 GT3 3.8 flat-6 will be replaced started by Sticky View original post
      Comments 15 Comments
      1. TT C6's Avatar
        TT C6 -
        Reminds me of the evil bastards at Ford trying to save a measly $100 per Mustang by retaining the pathetic solid rear axle. It ended up COSTING them an extra $100 per car instead.
        Anyone who bought a solid rear axle car once they could afford a C5 Corvette or better is an idiot.

        I hate Porshce, so I am glad this happened to them.
        Their ridiculous prices, crippling the Cayman to protect 911 profits, and retaining an inferior rear engine layout are all reasons I despise Porsche.
        If the current Cayman S, and current MSRP, included the Turbos 3.8TT and AWD, I would buy one tomorrow.
      1. Itsbrokeagain's Avatar
        Itsbrokeagain -
        um...even the Metzger engines had rod bolt issues. Have said pictures of 997 motors with this issue. So its not exactly a new motor design problem.
      1. leveraged sellout's Avatar
        leveraged sellout -
        Rod bolt problems can happen to any engine I guess, it is too bad that they haven't been able to get this engine into a competition setting where it is being pushed to the max and being further developed. I'm sure in time that will come.
      1. whoosh's Avatar
        whoosh -
        The GT1 block wasn't even Mezger's most impressive achievement. Mezger was the engineer responsible for the 917 prototype development in the late 60's and early 70's, which brought Porsche it's first LeMans victory and led eventually to the 917/30 Can-Am car. That car had a 5.4L twin turbo flat 12 capable of 1,500hp in qualifying trim, and raced with 1,000hp or more. The guy knew how to build a motor, that's for sure.

        Depending on the true cost to Porsche to replace each motor, this is quite expensive indeed. I think $10k is conservative for the motor, transport of the cars to/from customers, free trinkets to the customers to keep them happy, etc. That's $7 million down the crapper... Plus embarrassment, loss of potential sales, etc. ouch.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Itsbrokeagain Click here to enlarge
        um...even the Metzger engines had rod bolt issues. Have said pictures of 997 motors with this issue. So its not exactly a new motor design problem.
        I don't ever remember a GT3 recall with the GT1 motor that resulted in a new motor in every car of that model.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by whoosh Click here to enlarge
        The GT1 block wasn't even Mezger's most impressive achievement. Mezger was the engineer responsible for the 917 prototype development in the late 60's and early 70's, which brought Porsche it's first LeMans victory and led eventually to the 917/30 Can-Am car. That car had a 5.4L twin turbo flat 12 capable of 1,500hp in qualifying trim, and raced with 1,000hp or more. The guy knew how to build a motor, that's for sure.
        Very true.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by whoosh Click here to enlarge
        Depending on the true cost to Porsche to replace each motor, this is quite expensive indeed. I think $10k is conservative for the motor, transport of the cars to/from customers, free trinkets to the customers to keep them happy, etc. That's $7 million down the crapper... Plus embarrassment, loss of potential sales, etc. ouch.
        Porsche sells the motors for something like $30k...
      1. whoosh's Avatar
        whoosh -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Porsche sells the motors for something like $30k...
        Yeah, my guess of $10k is probably over conservative. If the all-in cost is $20k each, which is still probably a little low, it's a $15 million defect. That's a lot of Cayennes and Macans.
      1. 5soko's Avatar
        5soko -
        i have to ask, if this is such a defect so early in the engines life, what kind of engine testing and general testing is going on at porsche? I would think not so much miles and so many GT3's have been sold, but wouldn't porsche testing put alot of hours and miles on this engine to show what fails, and multiple engines of testing at this?
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 5soko Click here to enlarge
        i have to ask, if this is such a defect so early in the engines life, what kind of engine testing and general testing is going on at porsche? I would think not so much miles and so many GT3's have been sold, but wouldn't porsche testing put miles on this engine to show what fails, and multiple engines at this?
        It clearly didn't see the level of testing that the previous gen motor did, that's for certain.
      1. 5soko's Avatar
        5soko -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        It clearly didn't see the level of testing that the previous gen motor did, that's for certain.
        Thats for sure.. But i would think Porsche has a engine room and tests cars with these engines that puts them through alot of hours or testing/durability testing etc. Did none of there test engines have this issue, or maybe they have to go back and re-look at there durability testing and testing of engines procedure, increase them.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 5soko Click here to enlarge
        Thats for sure.. But i would think Porsche has a engine room and tests cars with these engines that puts them through alot of hours or testing/durability testing etc. Did none of there test engines have this issue, or maybe they have to go back and re-look at there durability testing and testing of engines procedure, increase them.
        Things slip by sometimes. Look at the S54, S65, etc.
      1. andrew20195's Avatar
        andrew20195 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by TT C6 Click here to enlarge
        If the current Cayman S, and current MSRP, included the Turbos 3.8TT and AWD, I would buy one tomorrow.
        That would require an extensive redesign of their AWD system. The Cayman engine sits pointing in the correct direction with the transmission behind the engine. The 911 engines are truly backwards in that the transmission sits in front of the engine and the propeller shaft drives the front differential.

        It would be nice if they'd develop a Cayman GT3, though. Preferably with an engine that doesn't lose rod bolts.
      1. benzy89's Avatar
        benzy89 -
        Not to diminish the discussion, but the Hans Mezger who worked in Porsche Motorsport does not have a "T" in his last name. Hans Metzger (with the T) is a historic German diplomat who was born in 1912.

        @Sticky, it's a commonly made spelling mistake, but you might want to edit the article.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        I think it is because there is a famous German diplomat names Hans Metzger. It is Mezger though for the engineer so good catch.